January storms added 580 billion gallons of water to California reservoirs

January 23, 2019 

Enterprise Record

Storms that soaked California during the first half of January did more than bring tons of snow to Sierra Nevada ski resorts. They also helped to significantly boost the state’s water supplies. Over the three weeks from Jan. 1 until this Tuesday, 47 key reservoirs that state water officials closely monitor added 580 billion gallons of water — as much as roughly 9 million people use in a year, according to an analysis by this newspaper. The combined storage in the reservoirs, which include critical components of California’s water supply like Shasta Lake, Folsom, Hetch Hetchy and San Luis Reservoir, has expanded from 15.96 million acre feet on New Year’s Day to 17.74 million acre feet now. Each acre foot is enough water to flood an acre of land a foot deep, or 325,851 gallons.

 


Newsom needs to make water supply, protections a priority

January 23,2019

San Francisco Chronicle 

Water issues are notoriously difficult for California governors. Just look at former Gov. Jerry Brown’s floundering tunnels proposal for the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Yet two factors suggest that Gov. Gavin Newsom must make water a priority. First, California needs more climate-resistant water supplies. Climate change is making California’s weather more extreme. For the past decade, most years have brought drought or the risk of catastrophic floods. And looking forward, scientists warn that climate change will reduce the water we get from our rivers.


SUNSET DISTRICT RESIDENTS COMPLAIN ABOUT TAP WATER

October 10, 2018

San Francisco Patch

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission announced it's testing the quality of the drinking water in the city's Sunset District after residents there complained over the weekend about the taste of their tap water.

In addition to testing the drinking water in the neighborhood, the commission's water quality team will also test the water in surrounding neighborhoods as a precaution, commission officials said.


FENNER VALLEY WATER AUTHORITY AND CADIZ INC. ESTABLISH $5 MILLION FUND FOR WATER QUALITY INVESTMENTS IN DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES

October 5, 2018

Cadiz Administration

The Fenner Valley Water Authority (“FVWA”) today announced the creation of a $5 Million fund, the Southern California Clean Water Fund (“Clean Water Fund” or “SCCWF”), dedicated to aiding small water systems that are pursuing water quality improvements in Southern California. The Clean Water Fund will be underwritten by Cadiz Inc. which is developing the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project, a public-private partnership to increase Southern California’s reliable water supplies by conserving groundwater presently lost to evaporation in eastern San Bernardino County.

FVWA will administer the fund, which is designed to be accessed by small water systems that serve disadvantaged communities in counties across Southern California. The Clean Water Fund will be dedicated to helping small water systems in disadvantaged communities and severely disadvantaged communities (“Eligible Small Water Systems”) develop and maintain water treatment systems.


CADIZ PROMISES $5 MILLION TO MOJAVE WATER SYSTEMS 

October 5, 2018

Los Angeles Business Journal

Cadiz Inc., the downtown water company with a proposed project to pump and transport water from an aquifer beneath its Mojave Desert land holdings, announced Oct. 5 that it plans to donate up to $5 million from project revenue towards efforts to improve water quality at nearby water systems and throughout Southern California.


THE COST OF CLEANING UP NITRATE CONTAMINATION FALLS ON AMERICA'S POOREST COUNTIES

October 2, 2018

Pacific Standard

A new report estimates that remediating contaminated small water systems could cost up to $666 a year per person.


ADVOCACY LEADS TO MULTILINGUAL WATER QUALITY REPORTING

October 1, 2018

ACLU Northern California

Everyone has the right to safe and clean drinking water. But tens of thousands of people in California are unknowingly exposed to dangerous toxins because the annual water quality reports sent to them are written almost exclusively in English. 

The ACLU Foundation of Northern California has been working on improving language access to water system information so that people will know if their water is free of toxic contaminants. And as a result of our advocacy, the state water board has agreed to issue translations in over two dozen languages.


360,000 CALIFORNIANS HAVE UNSAFE DRINKING WATER. ARE YOU ONE OF THEM?

June 1, 2018

Sacramento Bee

An estimated 360,000 Californians are served by water systems with unsafe drinking water, according to a McClatchy analysis of data compiled by the State Water Resources Control Board. In many communities, people drink, shower, cook and wash dishes with water containing excessive amounts of pollutants, including arsenic, nitrates and uranium.


TOXIC TAPS

The state estimates that 1.5 million Californians rely on drinking water that has violated health standards. And there are 200,000 people whose water is chronically contaminated with chemicals linked to cancer and other health effects. Those numbers don’t take into account the 2 million privately owned wells that are not regulated or routinely tested for toxins.